Category - Runway/Ramp

Cold In-Place Pavement Recycling Saves Money & Appeals to Community at St. Simons Island

Sitting on a small, exclusive island off the southeast coast of Georgia, McKinnon St. Simons Island Airport (SSI) serves an upscale population of private aircraft operators. Nevertheless, the airport faced a distinct financial quandary when it needed to resurface its badly deteriorating secondary runway: such projects are not eligible for FAA Airport Improvement Program funds.

New Paving Method Accelerates Runway Project at Grand Junction Regional

Like many airports, Grand Junction Regional (GJT) performs its airfield repairs late at night and early in the morning to avoid disrupting flight operations. Naturally, this stretches projects across more days because crews work in shorter shifts.

Atlanta Int'l Goes Below Ground to Map Interconnected Airfield Electrical Systems

In metropolitan Atlanta, locals commonly refer to the complex roadway intersection where Interstate 85 meets Interstate 285 as Spaghetti Junction. But it's not the only interchange to earn the descriptive moniker.

Porter County Regional Opts for Full-Depth Reclamation When Rebuilding Main Runway

There's more to the new $8 million main runway at Porter County Regional Airport (VPZ) in Valparaiso, IN, than meets the eye. Its point of difference lies beneath the surface in a sub-base built primarily with materials recycled from the previous ailing runway via a process called full-depth reclamation.

Detroit Metro Fast Tracks Reconstruction of Major Runway & Associated Taxiways

Detroit Metropolitan Wayne County Airport (DTW) recently completed the reconstruction of one of its primary arrivals runways, 4L-22R, and several associated taxiways. Major construction began in April 2016, and the runway reopened just seven months later in early November.

Long Beach Airport Modifies Layout to Improve Airfield Safety

With a notoriously vexing airfield configuration, Long Beach Airport (LGB) in southern California is leading the charge for an FAA initiative to reduce runway incursions throughout the United States.

Reconstructed Runway Rises From Rubble at Coles County Memorial

Reconstructed Runway Rises From Rubble at Coles County Memorial
Before Coles County Memorial Airport (MTO) in Mattoon, IL, reconstructed its 41-year-old main runway, the project team looked far and wide for the best way to keep costs down and cause the least possible disruption of day-to-day operations. The preferred strategy? Rubblization, a process that breaks down existing concrete into small, uniform chunks, thereby making it an ideal base for subsequent layers of asphalt or concrete.

Crews Use Advanced Systems to Repave Runway at Yakutat Airport

When the main runway at Alaska's Yakutat Airport (YAK) experienced damage from harsh hydrogeological conditions, the state's Department of Transportation and Public Facilities tread carefully when crafting a solution. As owner and operator of the airport, the department knows that any project in the lowlands area around the Gulf of Alaska includes extra hurdles-specifically weather and logistics.

Redmond Municipal Uses Communication, Planning to Mitigate Regional Impact of 3-Week Closure

There's no easy way-or good time-to shut down an airport for three weeks, especially a regional hub that serves as a major tourism gateway. But officials at Redmond Municipal Airport (RDM) pulled it off with nary a hitch during a recent $18.5 million runway reconstruction project.

Henderson Executive Installs LED Ramp Lights

When you hear the phrase "bright lights, big city," Las Vegas may be one of the first places that comes to mind. Effective light management, however, is an exacting science that takes into account many variables such as lumens, energy usage, lamp longevity and even light pollution. All of the above and more came into play when Henderson Executive Airport (HND), located in the very shadow of Vegas' world-famous "strip", expanded its airfield ramp area and installed new lighting during a four-month, $4 million project last fall.

Alaska Tries New Method for Repairing Runway Lights

Airfield maintenance can be tough at any location, but few places in North America present more challenges than northern Alaska. Keeping runway and taxiway lights working at the remote airfields that dot the state can be extremely challenging, and workers who undertake the job often work in downright punishing conditions.

Dallas Love Field Prepares for the Future with Timely Pavement Management Program

In early 2014, the city of Dallas and Dallas Love Field (DAL) were in a unique and ultimately timely position from operational and funding perspectives alike. The expiration of the Wright Amendment in October 2014 allowed air carriers to modify flight routes out of DAL, thereby increasing air traffic and changing the aircraft types needed to handle traffic. In addition, the upcoming 2017 expiration of the letter of intent associated with the long-running Love Field Modernization Program will make federal discretionary and entitlement dollars available for airfield-related projects that had been deferred because of the modernization program.

McCarran Int'l Completes Transition to All-Concrete Runways

In April, McCarran International Airport (LAS) in Las Vegas reopened its 14,500-foot primary runway, following a six-month closure. Runway 7L-25R, which handles about one-third of the airport's traffic, had been temporarily closed from October to April during each of the past two years to replace nearly 366,000 square yards of deteriorated asphalt concrete pavement. Now, aircraft operate on 19-inch-thick, full-strength Portland cement concrete pavement.

Virginia Commissions Statewide Airfield Assessments

Virginia Commissions Statewide Airfield Assessments
Armed with magnifying glasses and kneepads, crews spent the fall of 2014 examining the pavement and paint on every airfield at every public airport in Virginia. In total, they surveyed 62 commercial and general aviation facilities. As a result, airport operators and state officials now have a concrete plan to improve the safety and longevity of their runways, taxiways and aprons.

Baltimore/Washington Int'l Creates New Airfield While Complying with Runway Safety Area Regs

When officials at Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport (BWI) began strategizing about how to comply with the recent runway safety area deadline, they did not expect to end up with a new airfield. One decade later, however, that's essentially what they have.

Monterey Regional Adds Runway Safety Areas Amid Perfect Storm

Sometimes, the phrase "perfect storm" refers to a rare combination of events that leads to disaster. Other times, it describes similarly unusual circumstances that create an amazing outcome. Surprisingly, a recent runway safety area project at Monterey Regional Airport (MRY) met both definitions at various points.

Meadows Field Reduces Runway Reconstruction Cost With Quarter-Crown Design

When officials at Meadows Field Airport (BFL) in Bakersfield, CA, started planning to replace the facility's aging main runway, they expected a price tag of around $10 million. But the initial tally approached $70 million, prompting a bad case of sticker shock.

FAA Tests Green Pavement Materials

Research that may lead to more widespread use of “green” runway pavement materials is underway at the FAA National Airport Pavement & Materials Research Center, in Egg Harbor Township, NJ. Engineers at the new facility use a custom-designed heavy vehicle simulator to test asphalt and other pavement materials at high tire pressures and temperatures.

Kodiak Airport Builds Into Gulf of Alaska to Add Runway Safety Areas

Kodiak Benny Benson State Airport (ADQ) faced a quandary when devising plans to meet the federal mandate for runway safety areas: There simply wasn’t enough land at the island-bound Alaskan facility to add them. So planners got creative and built into the ocean. Contractors moved an estimated 1.1 million tons of rock to fill a portion of the Gulf of Alaska in order to create enough surface area for an engineered material arresting system (EMAS) on one runway and to lengthen another runway to allow for an EMAS bed on its other end.

New Runway Sensors at Denver Int’l Expected to Reduce Costs & Delays From Pavement Deicing

Denver International Airport (DEN) has a new tool at its disposal for managing winter operations: in-pavement sensors that help predict when ice will form on runway and other airfield surfaces. The system includes five clusters of sensors embedded in Runway 17L-35R, one of DEN’s four north/south runways, and three more clusters in adjacent high-speed taxiways. The in-pavement sensors were installed as part of a $46.5 million runway resurfacing project.

St. Louis Int'l Flattens Spending Curve with Pavement Preservation

Many airport operators feel they have limited options when it comes to airfield pavements. As vital concrete and asphalt assets age and deteriorate, they repair areas as needed and wait for the field's pavement condition index to dictate a replacement project. When that day comes and goes, a new version of the same cycle begins again.

Myrtle Beach Int'l Rehabs & Relights Sole Runway

How does an airport with just one runway maintain operations while rehabilitating that runway? After nine months of intense and highly coordinated work on Runway 18-36, Myrtle Beach International (MYR) has some answers.

Sea-Tac Reconstructs Center Runway to 40-year Design Standards

Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (SEA) recently completed the total reconstruction of Runway 16C-34C, giving new life to the oldest of its three runways. And what a life it will be. The 9,426-foot runway that was originally built in 1969 is now projected to have another 40-year lifecycle.

State Test Program Fully Funds Runway Project at Gainesville Regional

It's often a challenge to secure partial funding for major projects, but Gainesville Regional Airport (GNV) in Florida received full funding from the state for its recent $2.8 million runway renovation. Typically, the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) will pay up to 50% of construction expenses at state airports. However, it pays up to 100% of the cost for special demonstration projects.

Denver Int'l Eliminates Noise Fees & Improves Traffic Flow With Early NextGen Implementation

In addition to the standard noise abatement challenges all airports face, Denver International (DEN) has an additional layer of complexity: a stringent noise compliance agreement with its county that dates back to 1989. Each of the agreement's 101 points includes a $500,000 annual penalty; so noise infractions could potentially cost DEN more than $50 million every year.

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